Category Archives: Reviews

REVIEW: PURE finishes off Hulu’s Into The Dark with a reframing of The Craft through the lense of Christian purity balls.

Posted by

pure

Director Hannah McPherson delivers the final entry into Hulu and Blumhouse’s Into The Dark with an entry juxtaposing right-wing Christian fundamentalists with a mish-mash of The Craft and Carrie. Into the Dark, Hulu and Blumhouse’s monthly horror film series has

REVIEW: HAIL SATAN? is an interesting look at the grassroots political beginnings of The Satanic Temple, but borders on hagiography.

Posted by

hailsatan

Director Penny Lane’s slickly produced look at the humble beginning and growth of The Satanic Temple is interesting and worth a watch but wanders in looking for a focus and dances on the thin border of being a hagiographic puff

REVIEW: OFFICIAL SECRETS is an engrossing look at the accountability of government and its actions to its citizenry.

Posted by

official-secrets

Director Gavin Hood delivers a taught and gripping political drama that raises the question of how far should a government go in justifying actions in service of its allies against the legality of those actions to its people. Ever since

REVIEW: IT CHAPTER TWO serves up a fitting capstone for the IT saga, while shedding a light on the true horrors of the modern world.

Posted by

it2

Andy Muschietti’s follow up to 2017’s It brings the Loser’s Club and Pennywise The Dancing Clown 27 years forward into the modern-day while also showcasing that some of the darkest things to fear in the modern world aren’t of the

REVIEW: READY OR NOT serves up originality and subverts tropes in the summer’s best horror film.

Posted by

readyornot

Radio Silence’s latest film is a stylish original horror tale that follows in the vein of films like The Cabin in The Woods, Get Out, You’re Next, and Evil Dead in delivering a unique and subversive genre film that seems

REVIEW: GOOD BOYS is the definitive laugh out loud comedy of the summer.

Posted by

goodboys

Good Boys dances the fine line between light-hearted innocent fare and classic raunchy comedy with a silly but endearing tale about growing up. Seth Rogen has taken the baton from Judd Apatow in producing engaging and uproarious black comedies. From

REVIEW: SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK succeeds in creating an engaging and dark atmospheric film with genuine scares.

Posted by

scarystories

Director Andre Overdal channels the creepiness and edge he utilized so well in The Autopsy of Jane Doe into this period piece which channels classic horror with a contemporary edge. Scary Stories To Tell in the Dark is, without question,

REVIEW: SCHOOL SPIRIT’s take on high school slasher films is trope-heavy without adding a lot of originality to the genre.

Posted by

schoolspirit

Director Mike Gan lends some additional diversity to Blumhouse’s INTO THE DARK line-up, but the story by writers Gan, Josh Miller, and Patrick Casey serves up a largely lazy pastiche of highly recognizable past slasher film tropes with little new

REVIEW: Hobbs and Shaw is exactly the hyper-masculine anti-heroes vs. cyborgs action/buddy comedy cartoon of a film you never knew you needed.

Posted by

hobbsshaw

In which a movie where Dwayne Johnson holds a helicopter piloted by a cyborg from taking off with the sheer force of his biceps and a chain is somehow still maddeningly watchable in a non-ironic way. Last year, we had

REVIEW: Tilman Singer’s Luz is a hypnotic throwback to the horror stylings of Lucio Fulci and Dario Argento.

Posted by

luz

You never forget your first love applies to hosts of demonic possession and their keeper in this mesmerizing minimalist horror film with shades of Suspiria, The Beyond, and Exorcist 2: The Heretic in its DNA. For fans of the golden

REVIEW: Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is Quentin Tarantino’s love letter to the fading Golden Age of Hollywood of the late 1960’s

Posted by

once

Tarantino’s 9th film is an ephemeral glimpse of a Hollywood that might have been; one grounded in the last gasps of the changing world of 1960’s Hollywood. I’ve often said that the 1970s were the last true golden age of

REVIEW: The Art of Self-Defense is one of the year’s best dark comedies.

Posted by

selfdefense

Writer/Director Riley Stearns takes a look at the dark side of masculinity as it affects a local karate dojo in his shining sophomore feature follow-up to 2014’s Faults. Like a lot of other kids growing up in the suburbs in

REVIEW: “Spider-Man: Far From Home” is a fitting epilogue to the saga of Iron Man in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Posted by

sman2

Spider-Man: Far From Home is a solid piece of story-telling about the burden of carrying on a legacy that defines you in the eyes of others and aspiring to be your own man. As the epilogue to Phase 4 of

REVIEW: Midsommar (2019)

Posted by

midsommar-4

Directorial debuts, especially in the horror realm, tend to be the definition of hit or miss. The knockout entries in the former category (classics like George Romero’s, “Night of the Living Dead,” David Cronenberg’s “Eraserhead,” Tom Holland’s “Fright Night” and

REVIEW: Annabelle Comes Home (2019)

Posted by

annabelle-featured-image

“Miss me?” With barely two years passed since the surprisingly excellent sequel, “Annabelle: Creation” and a scant half decade of life for the franchise, the titular deadly doll has finally come home to haunt the family of Ed and Lorraine

BLU-RAY REVIEW: Us (2019) Blu-Ray Release from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment (2019)

Posted by

usbanner copy

A film with great ideas and a flawed execution; Jordan Peele’s Us hits Blu-Ray with a plethora of special features that really open up the ideas involved in the execution and fundamental themes in the film. Going into 2019, one

REVIEW: 5B opens a window to the nascent era of the 1980s AIDS epidemic and spotlights the unseen human element that rose up in its wake.

Posted by

5b

While directors Dan Knauss and Paul Haggis’ film 5B does an amazing job of putting the viewer in the midst of the xenophobia and fear surrounding the rise of the AIDS epidemic, the true wonder spotlighted is the human spirit

REVIEW: SHAFT is a throwback to the buddy cop comedies of the 80’s and the original blacksploitation classic.

Posted by

shaft

Black-ish creator and Girls Trip co-writer Kenya Barris along with Family Guy’s Alex Barnow craft a script that follows the too cool to suffer fools blueprint of the original franchise, while embedding it with a sense of the urban culture